PhotoSecrets CN Tower

A Photographer’s Guide

Best classic places spots hotspots sites sights views photo locations to photograph for photography with maps postcard photos cool beautiful pictures

Front matter

CN Tower
A Photographer’s Guide
Andrew Hudson

Photos

CN Tower and harbourWladyslaw/Wikipedia

CN Tower

25 views to photograph
CN Tower from Bathurst Street BridgePaul Bica/Wikipedia
Indoor Lookout LevelWladyslaw/Wikipedia
Laser lights from CN Tower at nightNigel Murray/Flickr
People at EdgeWalkRoger Ahlbrand/Flickr
View from Glass FloorFranklin Vera Pacheco/Wikipedia
360 RestaurantChensiyuan/Wikipedia
From base looking upRaysonho/Wikipedia
CN Tower from Spadina Avenue Bridge at duskUmair Khan/Wikipedia
CN Tower from Toronto City Centre Airport at dusk horizontal– Wladyslaw [disk ]/Wikipedia
CN Tower from Toronto City Centre Airport at dusk verticalWladyslaw, Correction Of Perspective Distortion:/Wikipedia
Toronto skyline and Centre Island FerryDennis Jarvis/Flickr
Toronto skyline from Algonquin Island with canoeChensiyuan/Wikipedia
Toronto skyline from Olympic Island at duskBenson Kua/Wikipedia
CN Tower main pod black-and-whiteAlan Shin/Wikipedia
Toronto skyline from Jennifer Kateryna Koval’s’kyj Park at duskMartin St-Amant/Wikipedia
Toronto skyline from Olympic IslandMarcin Wichary/Wikipedia
Views from CN TowerLaslovarga/Wikipedia

Maps

Map of CN Tower

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Contents

Foreword

A great travel photo­graph, like a great news photo­graph, requires you to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special moment. Professional photo­graphers have a short-hand phrase for this: “F8 and be there.”

There are countless books that can help you with photo­graphic technique, the “F8” portion of that equation. But until now, there’s been little help for the other, more critical portion of that equation, the “be there” part. To find the right spot, you had to expend lots of time and shoe leather to essentially re-invent the wheel.

In my career as a professional travel photo­grapher, well over half my time on location is spent seeking out the good angles. Andrew Hudson’s PhotoSecrets does all that legwork for you, so you can spend your time photo­graphing instead of wandering about. It’s like having a professional location scout in your camera bag. I wish I had one of these books for every city I photo­graph on assignment.

PhotoSecrets can help you capture the most beautiful sights with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of enjoyment. So grab your camera, find your favorite PhotoSecrets spots, and “be there!”

About Bob Krist

Bob Krist has photo­graphed assignments for National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Travel/­Holiday, Smithsonian, and Islands. He won “Travel photo­grapher of the Year” from the Society of American Travel Writers in 1994, 2007, and 2008.

For National Geographic, Bob has led round-the-world tours and a traveling lecture series. His book In Tuscany with Frances Mayes spent a month on The New York Times’ bestseller list and his how-to book Spirit of Place was hailed by American Photo­grapher magazine as “the best book about travel photo­graphy we’ve ever read.”

The parents of three sons, Bob and his wife live in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Welcome

Thank you for reading PhotoSecrets. As a fellow fan of travel and photo­graphy, I hope this guide will help you quickly find the most visually stunning places, and come home with equally stunning photo­graphs.

PhotoSecrets is designed to show you all the best sights. Flick through, see the classic views, and use them as a departure point for your own creations. Get comp­osition ideas, lighting tips, and a brief history. It’ll be like travelling with a location scout and a pro-photo­grapher by your side.

Now, start exploring — and take lots of photos!

About Andrew Hudson

Originally an engineer, Andrew Hudson started PhotoSecrets in 1995. His first book won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best First Book and his second won the Grand Prize in the National Self-Published Book Awards.

Andrew has published 15 nationally-distributed photo­graphy books. He has photo­graphed assignments for Macy’s, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Men’s Health and Seventeen, and been a location scout for Nikon. His photos and articles have appeared in Alaska Airlines, National Geographic Traveler, Shutterbug Outdoor and Nature photo­graphy, Where, and Woman’s World.

Andrew has a degree in Computer Engineering from Manchester University and a certificate in copyright law from Harvard Law School. Born in Redditch, England, he lives with his wife, two kids, and two chocolate Labs, in San Diego, California.

About PhotoSecrets

 
 
 

Introduction

At a Glance

Name:CN Tower (Tour CN)
AKA:Canadian National Tower
Address:301 Front Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2T6
Opened:1976
Height:553 m (1,815 ft) spire;
457 m (1,500.0 ft) roof;
446 m (1,465 ft) top floor
Floor count:147
Lifts:9
Fame:Icon of Toronto;
world’s 7th tallest free-standing structure
GPS:43.6426, -79.3871
Far:6.5 km (4 miles) from center of Toronto
Note:Has a glass floor and a revolving restaurant.
Website:cntower.ca

The CN Tower is a 553.33 m-high (1,815.4 ft) concrete communications and observation tower in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Built on the former Railway Lands, it was completed in 1976, becoming the world’s tallest free-standing structure and world’s tallest tower at the time. It held both records for 34 years until the completion of Burj Khalifa and Canton Tower in 2010. It is now the third tallest tower in the world and remains the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto’s skyline, and a symbol of Canada, attracting more than two million international visitors annually.

Its name “CN” originally referred to Canadian National, the railway company that built the tower. Following the railway’s decision to divest non-core freight railway assets, prior to the company’s privatization in 1995, it transferred the tower to the Canada Lands Company, a federal Crown corporation responsible for real estate development. Since the name CN Tower became common in daily usage, the abbreviation was eventually expanded to Canadian National Tower or Canada’s National Tower. However, neither of these names is commonly used.

In 1995, the CN Tower was declared one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It also belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers, where it holds second-place ranking.

Wikipedia

Back matter

Index

3

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

O

P

R

S

T

V

W

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